Invited Talks, Keynotes, and Lectures

  1. Prognosticating the Future of IoT Security, 2022 IEEE SafeThings Workshop, San Francisco, CA, May, 2022.
  2. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings: A Systems Perspective, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, March, 2022.
  3. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings: A Systems Perspective, CACR Security Speaker Series, Indiana University, Online, August, 2021.
  4. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings: A Systems Perspective, Robustness of AI Systems to Adversarial Attacks (RAISA3), Online, August, 2020.
  5. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings: A Systems Perspective, Computer Science Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, February, 2020.
  6. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, Computer Science Department, Stonybrook University, Stonybrook, NY, December, 2019.
  7. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, Cylab Security and Privacy Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, December, 2019.
  8. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, S2ERC, Ball State University, Muncie, IN, November, 2019.
  9. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, Triangle Area Privacy and Security Day, Durham, NC, October, 2019.
  10. AI-Cybersecurity Workshop Briefing to the NITRD and MLAI Subcommittees, NITRD and MLAI Subcommittees Quarterly Meeting, Washington, DC, July, 2019.
  11. Workshop on the Security and Privacy of Machine Learning, Workshop on the Security and Privacy of Machine Learning, International Conference on Machine Learning, Long Beach, CA, June, 2019.
  12. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, 2019 Subversion and Assurance of AI Workshop, US National Reconnaissance Office, Washington, DC, March, 2019.
  13. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, National Science Foundation, Alexandria, VA, March, 2019.
  14. Convergence of AI and IoT, Intelligence Community Studies Board, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences, The National Academy of Sciences/Engineering, Washington, DC, February, 2019.
  15. Tracing the Arc of Smartphone Application Security, Duke University, Durham, NC, February, 2019.
  16. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, Department of Computer Science, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, November, 2018.
  17. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, Department of Computer Science, Purdue University, West Lafeyette, Indiana, November, 2018.
  18. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, Computer Science Department, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, PA, October, 2018.
  19. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, Penn State University Alumni Association, University Park, PA, September, 2018.
  20. The Challenges of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, Department of Software and Information Systems, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, February, 2018.
  21. Tracing the Arc of Smartphone Application Security, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Tech University, Atlanta, GA, December, 2017.
  22. Tracing the Arc of Smartphone Application Security, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Ohio University, Athens, OH, October, 2017.
  23. Attacks, Defenses, and Impacts of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, 2017 Conference on Security and Privacy in Communication Networks (SecureComm), Niagara Falls, Canada, October, 2017.
  24. Attacks, Defenses, and Impacts of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, Celebrating 50 Years of Computer Science @ NC State, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, October, 2017.
  25. Tracing the Arc of Smartphone Application Security, Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Seminar Series, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, October, 2017.
  26. Tracing the Arc of Smartphone Application Security, Rochester Institute of Technology, College of Computing and Information Sciences, Rochester, NY, September, 2017.
  27. Tracing the Arc of Smartphone Application Security, University of Texas-Dallas, Department of Computer Science, Dallas, TX, May, 2017.
  28. Tracing the Arc of Smartphone Application Security, 2017 ACM on International Workshop on Security And Privacy Analytics, Scottsdale, AZ, March, 2017.
  29. Tracing the Arc of Smartphone Application Security, The Ohio State University, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Columbus, OH, March, 2017.
  30. Tracing the Arc of Smartphone Application Security, University of California-Irvine, Computer Science Department, Irvine, CA, March, 2017.
  31. Tracing the Arc of Smartphone Application Security, Virginia Technical University, Department of Computer Science, Blacksburg, VA, March, 2017.
  32. Tracing the Arc of Smartphone Application Security, 12th International Conference on Information Systems Security , Jaipur, India, December, 2016.
  33. Tracing the Arc of Smartphone Application Security, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI, November, 2016.
  34. Machine Intelligence in Adversarial Settings, Developing a Normative Framework for Cyberwarfare, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD, September, 2016.
  35. Eight Years of Mobile Smartphone Security, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, September, 2016.
  36. Eight Years of Mobile Smartphone Security, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ, September, 2016.
  37. Setting a Cyber-Security Baseline for Physical Systems: Terminology, Technologies, and Goals, Pacific Northwest Clean Water Association, webinar, August, 2016.
  38. The Limitations of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, 25th International Conference on Computer Communication and Networks (ICCCN 2016), Waikoloa, HI, August, 2016.
  39. Learning from Ourselves: Where are we and where can we go in mobile systems security?, Mobile Security Technologies (MOST) 2016 Workshop, IEEE Computer Society Security and Privacy Workshops, San Jose, CA, May, 2016.
  40. Eight Years of Mobile Smartphone Security, Center for Secure and Dependable Systems (CSDS) Cybersecurity Symposium, Coeur d'Alene, April, 2016.
  41. Eight Years of Mobile Smartphone Security, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, April, 2016.
  42. Army Installation 2035: Cyber Challenges and Opportunities, US Department of Defense, Arlington, VA, April, 2016.
  43. The Limitations of Machine Learning in Adversarial Settings, Florida Institute on National Security Assured Autonomy Workshop, Fort Myers, FL, February, 2016.
  44. SABOT: Specification-based Payload Generation for Programmable Logic Controllers, Messaging, Malware and Mobile Anti-Abuse Working Group (M3AAWG) , San Francisco, CA, February, 2016.
  45. Seven Years of Mobile Smartphone Security, Computer and Information Sciences Department, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, January, 2016.
  46. Seven Years of Mobile Smartphone Security, Massachusetts Institute of Technology--Lincoln Labs, Lexington, MA, January, 2016.
  47. Six Years of Mobile Smartphone Security, Information Trust Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign, IL, September, 2015.
  48. The Importance of Measurement and Decision Making to a Science of Security, 2015 IEEE Conference on Communications and Network Security, Florence, Italy, September, 2015.
  49. The Importance of Measurement and Decision Making to a Science of Security, 3rd International Symposium on Resilient Cyber Systems, Philadelphia, PA, August, 2015.
  50. Six Years of Mobile Smartphone Security, CISPA Distinguished Lecture Series, Max Planck Institute/Saarland University, Saarbrucken Germany, July, 2015.
  51. Six Years of Mobile Smartphone Security, Technische Universtat Darmstadt, Darmstadt Germany, July, 2015.
  52. Estimating Attack Intent and Mission Impact From Detection Signals, Workshop on Cyber Attack Detection, Forensics and Attribution for Assessment of Mission Impact, NATO Science and Technology Organization, Information Systems Technology Panel, Istanbul, Turkey, June, 2015.
  53. The Importance of Measurement and Decision Making to a Science of Security, 2015 Symposium And Bootcamp on the Science of Security (Hotsos), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, April, 2015.
  54. Security and Science of Agility, First ACM Workshop on Moving Target Defense (MTD 2014), Scottsdale, AZ, November, 2014.
  55. Evaluating Mobile Smartphone Security: The First Five Years, Computer Science Colloquium Series, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Boston, MA, October, 2014.
  56. A Secondary Internet Revolution: How the Smart Device has Changed the Information Security Landscape, IEEE New Technology Industry Seminar (NTIS `13), Everett, WA, August, 2013.
  57. Geotargeting: Mobile Device Privacy and Security, National Academy of Sciences, Washington DC, February, 2013.
  58. Authentication and Web Security, Security and Privacy in IT-EMTM 604 Guest Lecture, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, February, 2013.
  59. The Realities of Voting: A Retrospective of Ten Years of Information Security and Electronic Voting Systems, 2012 Information Assurance Day, Computer Science Department, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, PA, November, 2012.
  60. Permission-based Application Governance; A Step Forward or Backward?, 26th Annual WG 11.3 Conference on Data and Applications Security and Privacy (DBSec'12), Paris, France, July, 2012.
  61. Evaluating Mobile Smartphone Security: The First Four Years, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, April, 2012.
  62. Scalable Integrity-Guaranteed AJAX, The 14th Asia-Pacific Web Conference (APWeb), Kunming, China, April, 2012.
  63. Evaluating Mobile Smartphone Application Security, Singapore Management University, Singapore, September, 2011.
  64. Evaluating Mobile Smartphone Application Security, Computer Security Foundations Symposium, Florham Park, NJ, July, 2011.
  65. Security Challenges and Solutions in Mobile Smartphone Applications, Computer Security Foundations Symposium, Domaine de l'Abbaye des Vaux de Cernay, France, June, 2011.
  66. Security Challenges and Solutions in Mobile Smartphone Applications, Computer and Information Science Department, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, April, 2011.
  67. Identifying (and Addressing) Security and Privacy Issues in Smart Electric Meters, Center for Non-Linear Studies, Los Alamos, NM, February, 2011.
  68. Security Challenges and Solutions in Mobile Smartphone Applications, Department of Software Information Systems College of Computing and Informatics, UNC Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, December, 2010.
  69. Security Challenges and Solutions in Mobile Smartphone Applications, Computer Science Department, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, PA, December, 2010.
  70. Security Challenges and Solutions in Mobile Smartphone Applications, Computer Science Department, Georgetown University, Washington D.C., November, 2010.
  71. Security Challenges and Solutions in Mobile Smartphone Applications, Networking and Security Research Center, Computer Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, October, 2010.
  72. Security Challenges and Solutions in Mobile Smartphone Applications, Security Day Seminar, Penn State University, University Park, PA, October, 2010.
  73. The Changing Vulnerability Landscape, Association for Computing Machinery, Penn State Student Chapter, University Park, PA, September, 2010.
  74. The Changing Vulnerability Landscape, ExxonMobil, Falls Church, VA, March, 2010.
  75. The Impact of Supply Chain on Information and Communications Technology Security, The 1st Workshop on Telecommunications Infrastructure Protection and Security, Honolulu, HI, December, 2000.
  76. Energy Theft in the Advanced Metering Infrastructure, Networking and Security Research Center, Computer Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, October, 2009.
  77. Secure Provenance in High-End Computing Systems, NSF HECURA FSIO PI Meeting, Arlington, VA, August, 2009.
  78. Missing Glue: Architectural Support for Security Annotations, National Science Foundation Security Driven Architecture Workshop, Arlington, VA, July, 2009.
  79. Scalable Integrity-Justified Content Provenance, NSERC ISSNet Workshop, Ottawa, Canada, June, 2009.
  80. Utility Grid Automation and Risk Management, Clean Technology Conference and Expo, Houston, Texas, May, 2009.
  81. Scalable Integrity-Justified Content Provenance, Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, April, 2009.
  82. Scalable Integrity-Justified Content Provenance, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, April, 2009.
  83. What is Security, Dickenson Law School, Penn State University, State College, PA, April, 2009.
  84. Scalable Integrity-Justified Content Provenance, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Notre Dame University, South Bend, IN, April, 2009.
  85. Electronic Voting: The Good, the Bad, and the Reality, Software Engineering Research Center Showcase, Muncie, IN, November, 2008.
  86. Ohio Voting Systems Integrity: The EVEREST Report, Networking and Security Research Center, Computer Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, October, 2008.
  87. Data Provenance: Challenges and Technology, Cyber Physical System Security Forum, Cyber Security Research and Development Review, Washington DC, October, 2008.
  88. System-Wide Information Flow Enforcement, NICIAR PI Meeting, Washington DC, September, 2008.
  89. Presto: Configuration Management at Massive Scale, NSF Workshop on Assurable and Usable Security Configuration, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, August, 2008.
  90. Asymmetry in Performance and Security Requirements for I/O in High-end Computing, NSF HECURA FSIO PI Meeting, Arlington, VA, August, 2008.
  91. Authentication and Web Security, Security and Privacy in IT-EMTM 604 Guest Lecture, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, May, 2008.
  92. SPAM and SPAM Mitigation, Computer Science Department, St. Vincent's University, Latrobe, PA, April, 2008.
  93. Phones, The Press, Research and Grad School ... or how to make trouble and have fun doing it, Computer Science Department, St. Vincent's University, Latrobe, PA, April, 2008.
  94. Applications and Services in Telecommunications Networks, NSF Wireless Security Workshop, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, March, 2008.
  95. Vulnerabilities and Opportunities in SMS-Capable Cellular Networks, Computer Science Department, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, March, 2008.
  96. Ohio Voting Systems Integrity: The EVEREST Report, Case-Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, February, 2007.
  97. Ohio Voting Systems Integrity: The EVEREST Report, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, February, 2007.
  98. Ohio Voting Systems Integrity: The EVEREST Report, Ohio University, Athens, OH, February, 2007.
  99. Ohio Voting Systems Integrity: The EVEREST Report, Miami University, Ohio, Oxford, OH, February, 2007.
  100. Ohio Voting Systems Integrity: The EVEREST Report, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH, February, 2007.
  101. Vulnerabilities and Opportunities in SMS-Capable Cellular Networks, Computer Science Department, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, PA, September, 2007.
  102. Asymmetry in Performance and Security Requirements for I/O in High-End Computing, HECIWG FSIO 2007 Workshop, NSF, Arlington, VA, August, 2007.
  103. Toward Valley-Free Interdomain Routing, IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC) 2007, Glasgow, Scotland, June, 2007.
  104. Extending Developer Tools for Security-Typed Languages, Software Engineering Research Center Fall Showcase, West Lafayette, IN, June, 2007.
  105. Open Functionality in SMS/Cellular Networks, Computer and Information Science, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, May, 2007.
  106. Open Functionality in SMS/Cellular Networks, Computer Security Symposium, St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN, May, 2007.
  107. Authentication and Web Security, Security and Privacy in IT-EMTM 604 Guest Lecture, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, April, 2007.
  108. Grains of SANs: Building Storage Area Networks from Memory Spots, CISCO Remote Faculty Seminar, University Park, PA, April, 2007.
  109. Grains of SANs: Building Storage Area Networks from Memory Spots, 2007 IEEE Security and Privacy Crystal Ball Workshop, Hawthorne, NY, January, 2007.
  110. Password Exhaustion: Predicting the End of Password Usefulness, 2nd International Conference on Information Systems Security , Kolkata, India, December, 2006.
  111. Privacy Preserving Web-based Email, 2nd International Conference on Information Systems Security, Kolkata, India, December, 2006.
  112. Physical and Digital Convergence: Where the Internet is the Enemy, Eighth International Conference on Information and Communications Security (ICICS '06), Raleigh, NC, December, 2006.
  113. Extending Developer Tools for Security-Typed Languages, Software Engineering Research Center Fall Showcase, Muncie, IN, November, 2006.
  114. Open Functionality in SMS/Cellular Networks, Johns Hopkins University, Computer Science Department, Baltimore, MD, September, 2006.
  115. Open Functionality in SMS/Cellular Networks, George Mason University, Computer Science Department, Fairfax, VA, September, 2006.
  116. Exploiting Open Functionality in SMS-Capable Cellular Networks, Motorola Security Symposium, Itasca, Il, September, 2006.
  117. lseb: Testing Large Scale BGP Security in Replayable Network Environments, NSF/DETER Community Workshop, Arlington, VA, June, 2006.
  118. BGPRV: A Library for Fast and Efficient Routing Data Manipulation, NSF/DETER Community Workshop, Arlington, VA, June, 2006.
  119. JifClipse: Extending Developer Tools for Security-Typed Languages, Software Engineering Research Center Spring Showcase, Shaumburg, IL, June, 2006.
  120. Trends in Security: Critical Engineering in the Large, Schlumberger InnovateIT! 2006, Cambridge, MA, May, 2006.
  121. Information Flow Revisited: Software Engineering to Provable Security, Network Center of Excellence, Motorola Labs, Shaumburg, IL, May, 2006.
  122. Authentication and Web Security, Security and Privacy in IT-EMTM 604 Guest Lecture, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, April, 2006.
  123. Exploiting Open Functionality in SMS-Capable Cellular Networks, InfraGard Pittsburgh Chapter General Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA, March, 2006.
  124. Exploiting Open Functionality in SMS-Capable Cellular Networks, Computer Science Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, January, 2006.
  125. Software Engineering Tools for Security-Typed Languages: Using Eclipse to Make Secure Programming Practical, Software Engineering Research Center Showcase, Muncie, IN, November, 2005.
  126. Exploiting Open Functionality in SMS-Capable Cellular Networks, AT&T IP Services Security Council, Middletown, NJ, October, 2005.
  127. Exploiting Open Functionality in SMS-Capable Cellular Networks, Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, October, 2005.
  128. Exploiting Open Functionality in SMS-Capable Cellular Networks, Computer Science Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT, October, 2005.
  129. Exploiting Open Functionality in SMS-Capable Cellular Networks, Computer Science Department, SUNY-Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, October, 2005.
  130. Exploiting Open Functionality in SMS-Capable Cellular Networks, Networking and Security Research Center, Computer Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, October, 2005.
  131. lseb: Trace Driven Modeling of Internet-Scale BGP Attacks and Countermeasures, 2nd Annual DETER/EMIST Workshop, Newport Beach, CA, September, 2005.
  132. Critical Infrastructure Security through Provably Secure Network Mediation, 2nd Japan/US Workshop on Critical Information Infrastructure Protection (CIIP), Tokyo, Japan, June, 2005.
  133. Extending Developer Tools for Security-typed Languages, Software Engineering Research Center Showcase, West Lafayette, IN, June, 2005.
  134. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, 2005 IEEE Communications Quality and Reliability (CQR) International Workshop, St. Petersburg, FL, April, 2005.
  135. Analysis of Security Vulnerabilities in the Movie Production and Distribution Process, Messiah College, Senior Seminar Series, Grantham, PA, April, 2005.
  136. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, Intel Research, Folsom CA, April, 2005.
  137. Key Distribution Strategies For Low-Power Wireless Networks, Network Center of Excellence, Motorola Labs, Shaumburg, IL, April, 2005.
  138. Policy Evolution: Autonomic Environmental Security, Software Engineering Research Center Showcase, Muncie, IN, December, 2004.
  139. Information Assurance for Enterprise Networks, BAE Systems, Networking Seminar, Reston, VA, November, 2004.
  140. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, Computer Science Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, October, 2004.
  141. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, October, 2004.
  142. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, Computer Science Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, MD, September, 2004.
  143. Analysis of Security Vulnerabilities in the Movie Production and Distribution Process, Computer Science and Engineering Student Organization, University Park, PA, September, 2004.
  144. Useless Metaphors? Why Specifying Policy is So Hard, Workshop on Usable Privacy and Security Software, Center for Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science (DIMACS), New Brunswick, New Jersey, July, 2004.
  145. Analysis of Security Vulnerabilities in the Movie Production and Distribution Process, Information Systems Research Seminar, Stern School of Business, New York University, New York, NY, April, 2004.
  146. Analysis of Security Vulnerabilities in the Movie Production and Distribution Process, Ball State University, Muncie, IN, April, 2004.
  147. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, Computer Science Department, University of Illinois, Champaign, IL, March, 2004.
  148. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, Computer Science and Engineering Department, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, March, 2004.
  149. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, Computer Science Department, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, March, 2004.
  150. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, Department of Computer Science, University of Massachusetts - Amherst, Amherst, MA, March, 2004.
  151. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, Computer Science and Engineering Department, Penn State University, University Park, PA, March, 2004.
  152. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, February, 2004.
  153. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, Computer Science Department, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, February, 2004.
  154. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, Computer Science Department, SUNY-Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, February, 2004.
  155. Attack Profiling and Simulation in Interdomain Routing, P2INGS Quarterly Meeting, Tempe, AZ, February, 2004.
  156. Analysis of Security Vulnerabilities in the Movie Production and Distribution Process, AT&T Finance Lunch, Morristown, NJ, January, 2004.
  157. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, AT&T IP Security Conference, Middletown, NJ, November, 2003.
  158. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, 10th ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS), Washington, DC, October, 2003.
  159. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, Computer Science Department, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, October, 2003.
  160. Origin Authentication in Interdomain Routing, Computer Science Department, Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ, September, 2003.
  161. Analysis of Security Vulnerabilities in the Movie Production and Distribution Process, 31st Technology Policy Research Conference (TPRC), Arlington, VA, September, 2003.
  162. On Context in Authorization Policy, 8th ACM Symposium on Access Control Models and Technologies, Como, Italy, June, 2003.
  163. The Antigone Project, DARPA Principal Investigator Meeting, San Antonio, TX, January, 2003.
  164. Methods and Limitations of Security Policy Reconciliation, 2002 IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, Oakland, CA, May, 2002.
  165. Policy Management in Distributed Systems, Cigital, Washington, DC, April, 2002.
  166. Antigone: Policy Management in Secure Group Communication, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, April, 2001.
  167. Antigone: Policy Management in Secure Group Communication, Computer Science Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, MD, April, 2001.
  168. Antigone: Policy Management in Secure Group Communication, Computer Science Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, April, 2001.
  169. Antigone: Policy Management in Secure Group Communication, Computer Science Department, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, April, 2001.
  170. Antigone: Policy Management in Secure Group Communication, Computer Science Department, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, March, 2001.
  171. Antigone: Policy Management in Secure Group Communication, AT&T Shannon Laboratory, Florham Park, NJ, February, 2001.
  172. Antigone: Policy Management in Secure Group Communication, Telcordia Applied Research Laboratory, Morristown, NJ, February, 2001.
  173. Policy Problem Area 3 - Overview and Requirements, Internet Engineering Task Force MSEC BOF, San Diego, CA, December, 2000.
  174. Multicast Security Policy Requirements and Building Blocks, Quarterly Secure Multicast Research Group Meeting (SMuG), San Diego, CA, December, 2000.
  175. Antigone: Implementing Policy in Secure Multiparty Communication, Systems Design and Implementation (SDI) / Laboratory for Computer Systems (LCS) seminar series, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, November, 2000.
  176. Secure Group Communication in Antigone 2.0, 11th Annual IPoCSE Research Symposium, Ann Arbor, MI, October, 2000.
  177. Antigone Secure Group Communication, Bi-Annual DARPA Visit, Software System Research Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI, September, 2000.
  178. Problem Area 3: Policy, Quarterly Secure Multicast Research Group Meeting (SMuG), Pittsburgh, PA, July, 2000.
  179. Windowed Certificate Revocation, IEEE INFOCOM 2000, Tel Aviv, Israel, March, 2000.
  180. A Response to `Can We Eliminate Certificate Revocation Lists?', Financial Cryptography 2000, Anguilla, British West Indies, February, 2000.
  181. Multicast Security Policy Definition, Quarterly Secure Multicast Research Group Meeting (SMuG), Washington, DC, November, 1999.
  182. Antigone: A Flexible Framework for Secure Group Communication, Quarterly Secure Multicast Research Group Meeting (SMuG, NAI Labs, Baltimore, MD, September, 1999.
  183. Antigone: A Flexible Framework for Secure Group Communication, 10th Annual IPoCSE Research Symposium, Ann Arbor, MI, September, 1999.
  184. Antigone: A Flexible Framework for Secure Group Communication, 8th USENIX Security Symposium, Washington, DC, August, 1999.
  185. Antigone: A Flexible Framework for Secure Group Communication, IBM Watson Security Seminar, Westchester County, NY, July, 1999.
  186. Windowed Revocation in Public Key Infrastructures, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, September, 1998.
  187. Scalable Key Distribution Hierarchy, 9th Annual IPoCSE Research Symposium, Ann Arbor, MI, March, 1998.
  188. JavaLauncher Applet Platform, NASA, Kennedy Space Center Security Seminar, Kennedy Space Center, FL, January, 1998.
  189. Secure High Performance Group Communication, Directed Study Defense, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, September, 1997.
  190. Understanding Android's Security Framework, ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS), New York, NY, October, 2008.
  191. Web Security, The Thirteenth International World Wide Web Conference (WWW2004), New York, NY, May, 2004.
  192. Network and Information Security, Regional Laboratory for Network Engineering Research and Training Institute, National Science Foundation,Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, March, 2003.

Patrick McDaniel - patrickmcdaniel.org